News

June 14th 2021

Israel’s new prime minister is sworn in, ending Netanyahu’s 12-year grip on power

Naftali Bennett was sworn in as Israel’s new prime minister on Sunday, after winning a confidence vote with the narrowest of margins, just 60 votes to 59. His victory ends a 12-year grip on power by former prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the country’s longest-serving leader.After four elections in two years, Bennett’s incoming government breaks a long political deadlock and ushers in the most diverse coalition Israel has ever seen, including the first Arab party to serve in the government. In his speech before the Knesset confidence vote, Bennett celebrated the diversity and warned of polarization within the country.

Christian Eriksen suffered cardiac arrest during Euros match and ‘was gone’ before resuscitation, doctor says

Christian Eriksen “was gone” before being resuscitated from cardiac arrest, Denmark’s team doctor said at a press conference Sunday.The Danish soccer player collapsed on the pitch during his team’s opening Euro 2020 match against Finland.”Well, what should I say? He was gone. And we did cardiac resuscitation and it was cardiac arrest. How close were we? I don’t know,” said Morten Boesen.

“We got him back after one ‘de-fib,’ so that is quite fast,” the team doctor added, referring to the defibrillator used to revive Eriksen. “The details…I am not a cardiologist, so the details about what happened and further I will leave to the experts.”

Eriksen sent greetings to his Danish teammates from hospital where he is recovering after falling on the pitch shortly before halftime.

Mark Zuckerberg plans to work remotely for at least half of the next year

Facebook is giving its employees more flexibility to work outside the office — and Mark Zuckerberg is leading by example.The Facebook CEO told employees in a memo Wednesday that he plans to work remotely for at least half of the next year, a company spokesperson confirmed to CNN Business. The memo was previously reported by the Wall Street Journal.”I’ve found that working remotely has given me more space for long-term thinking and helped me spend more time with my family, which has made me happier and more productive at work,” Zuckerberg wrote, according to the Journal.

On Wednesday, Facebook said it would allow employees across all levels of the company to apply for remote work if their role allows them to do so. Employees who want to come back to the office can do so on a flexible basis but will be encouraged to spend at least half their time in the office, and employees can spend up to 20 working days in a year in a remote location.

Spare ticket for spaceflight with Jeff Bezos auctioned for $28 million

What would you pay to take a jolting, 11-minute trip into suborbital space alongside Jeff Bezos? According to bidders in an auction that wrapped up Saturday, it’s worth $28 million.The company kicked off the auction last month — before it was revealed that billionaire founder and Amazon mogul Bezos, along with his brother Mark Bezos, would be on board New Shepard’s inaugural crewed mission.

Blue Origin sales director Ariane Cornell said during a livestream of the event that 7,600 people from 159 countries had registered and were able to bid in the auction, which was hosted by Boston-based RR Auction, on Saturday. The name of the winning bidder was not revealed. The flight is expected to take off from Blue Origin’s facilities in West Texas town of Van Horn, on July 20.

How a massive part of the internet went down for an hour

The company behind Tuesday’s massive internet outage has apologized for making a costly mistake that knocked out websites, apps and online services across the world.Fastly, which runs a content delivery network of servers and data centers, also said in a statement late Tuesday that it would work to prevent such a widespread failure in the future.”Even though there were specific conditions that triggered this outage, we should have anticipated it,” said Nick Rockwell, Fastly’s senior vice president of engineering and infrastructure in the statement. “We provide mission critical services, and we treat any action that can cause service issues with the utmost sensitivity and priority. We apologize to our customers and those who rely on them for the outage.”

Box Office: ‘In the Heights’ Disappoints With $11 Million Opening Weekend

“In the Heights,” the acclaimed adaptation of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Broadway show, didn’t hit all the right notes in its box office debut.

The Warner Bros. musical generated a wane $11.4 million from 3,456 U.S. theaters in its first four days of release, below earlier expectations suggesting the feel-good film would reach $20 million. “In the Heights” also opened on HBO Max, the streaming service owned by the studio’s parent company WarnerMedia, though the company didn’t report its digital viewership.

The disappointing commercial reception for “In the Heights” is puzzling because critics embraced the joyous film, showering it with some of the best reviews of the pandemic era. Moreover, Warner Bros. put substantial marketing heft behind the picture, and director Jon M. Chu and Miranda devoted a great deal of energy into promoting the movie, which compensated for the fact that its cast was comprised of mostly unknown stars and emerging actors.

Though it’s impossible to know the full impact, the film’s hybrid release on HBO Max likely affected its box office business.

Forget Going Back to the Office—People Are Just Quitting Instead

More U.S. workers are quitting their jobs than at any time in at least two decades, signaling optimism among many professionals while also adding to the struggle companies face trying to keep up with the economic recovery.

The wave of resignations marks a sharp turn from the darkest days of the pandemic, when workers craved job security while weathering a national health and economic crisis. In April, the share of U.S. workers leaving jobs was 2.7%, according to the Labor Department, a jump from 1.6% a year earlier to the highest level since at least 2000.

The shift by workers into new jobs and careers is prompting employers to raise wages and offer promotions to keep hold of talent. The appetite for change by employees indicates many professionals are feeling confident about jumping ship for better prospects, despite elevated unemployment rates.

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